HISTORICAL BACKGROUND   OPENING HOURS    STAFF    CONTACT US    In Swedish liten engelsk flagga
 

 HOME    SEARCH    TREATMENT    TRAINING    RESEARCH                                                    LINKS

Research

The research at the Erica Foundation concerns child and adolescent psychotherapy, various types of educational programs in the field and questions regarding supervision and learning processes.

We conduct research collaboration activities with
Gunnar Carlberg PhD, Professor, licensed psychologist and psychotherapist, the Erica Foundation and Department of Education, Stockholm University and Dr Nick Midgley, M.Sc., Psych. D., Anna Freud Centre/University College London, England. Dr Midgley has a long-standing position as a visiting research consultant.
 

 

Workshop report
Child and Adolescent
Psychotherapy Research

 

OUTCOME IN PSYCHODYNAMIC CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOTHERAPY

2004 – ongoing

Project leader: Gunnar Carlberg PhD, Professor, licensed psychologist and psychotherapist.

Project co-ordinator: Anders Shiöler, licensed psychologist and psychotherapist at the Erica Foundation.

Aim. To study outcome in child psychotherapy (4-12 years of age at start of therapy ≥ 10 sessions) and psychotherapies with young people (16-24 years at start of therapy ≥ 10 sessions).

Method. Data is continuously collected from child and adolescent psychotherapies. Pre- and post measures with CGAS/GAF, SDQ, DSM-IV, SCL-90. The database contains approximately 200 child psychotherapies and 150 psychotherapies with adolescents and young people (Dec. 2010).

Results. Published reports and master thesis (in Swedish). International publications planned.

Financial support: The study is supported by Gålöstiftelsen.

SHORT-TERM PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

2007 – 2012

Project leader: Agneta Thorén PhD, licensed psychologist and psychotherapist at the Erica Foundation.

Aim. To study process and outcome in time limited psychotherapy (12 sessions) with children (5-9 years of age) and young people (16-24 years of age).

Method. In this study the process of change is followed with the help of various specific research instruments, questionnaires and interviews. Waiting-list control is part of the project. Besides routine psychological assessment at the start of therapy the following instruments are used: DSM-IV, CGAS/GAF, SCL-90, SDQ (parent and teacher versions). The same instruments are used after therapy. In connection with each session the child psychotherapist and the parental counsellor make process notes and complete a form, FWC–Feeling Word Checklist and a "process-diary", in order to follow the therapists' counter-transference feelings, work with central theme/focus of each therapy. Data will be analysed using both qualitative and quantitative methods.

Time schedule: Collection of data started in 2009. Data collection will be completed 2011.

Financial support: The study is supported by a research grant from Stockholm City Council.

Results. Published reports and master thesis (in Swedish). International publications planned.

The Erica Process and Outcome Study (EPOS)

2001 - on going

Project leader: Gunnar Carlberg PhD, Professor, licensed psychologist and psychotherapist.

Project co-ordinator: Fredrik Odhammar, licensed psychologist and psychotherapist at the Erica Foundation, PhD student.

Aim: To study outcome and process in "goal directed, time-limited child psychotherapy with parallel parental counselling".

Method: Extensive data was collected from 38 cases. Child guidance clinics from different parts of Sweden and Denmark were involved in the project. The children were between 5 and 10 years of age at the beginning of therapy. Therapy frequency was 1-2 sessions a week with duration of 1-2 years. The parents met their counsellor once a week or at least every fortnight. Therapists and parents formulated goals and frames for the therapies as carefully as possible at the start of therapy.

Besides questionnaires, interviews and routine psychological assessment at the start of therapy the following instruments was used: DSM-IV, HCAM–The Hampstead Child Adaption Measure, and SDQ–Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (parent and teacher versions). The same instruments were used after therapy. In connection with each session the child psychotherapist and the parental counsellor made process notes and completed a form, FWC–Feeling Word Checklist. Data collection has been completed.

Financial support: The study is supported by a research grant from Stiftelsen Marcus and Amalia Wallenbergs Minnesfond.

References:

Carlberg, G, Thorén, A, Billström, S. & Odhammar, F. (2009). Children’s expectations and experiences of psychodynamic child psychotherapy, Journal of Child Psychotherapy. 35 (2), 175-193.

Carlberg, G. (2009). Exploring change processes in psychodynamic child psychotherapy: The therapists’ perspective. I N. Midgley et al. (Red.) Child Psychotherapy and Research: New Approaches, Emerging Findings, London: Routledge.. 35 (2), 175-193.

Maar, V, Poulsen, D., Dittmann, H., Gregersen, R. & Bentz, M. (2007). Terapeutisk alliance i forældrebehandling. [Abstract in English: Therapeutic alliance in treatment of parents.] Matrix, 24, 4-30.

Odhammar, F., Carlberg, G., Sundin, E.C. & Jonsson, M. (2011). Children in psychodynamic psychotherapy. Changes in global functioning. Journal of Child Psychoterapy, 37 (3), 261-279.

MEMORIES OF SIGNIFICANT EPISODES IN PSYCHODYNAMIC CHILD PSYCHOTHERAPY

2004 – 2007

Project leader: Gunnar Carlberg PhD, Associate Professor, licensed psychologist and psychotherapist.

Aim. To study psychotherapists’ memories of significant episodes in relation to experiences of process and outcome in child psychotherapy.

Method. Therapists (n=31) were asked to retrieve emotionally valenced therapy episodes by using an autobiographical memory approach, with cue words to elicit specific episodes (e.g. irritated, ashamed, loving, and elated).

Results. All participants were able to retrieve memories of episodes. When asked to rate each memory, negative memories were returned to less often, and overall positive memories were rated as more easy to recall and more vivid. Memories derived from positive cue words also were judged to have a more positive importance for outcome compared to negative. Surprisingly, memories derived from the cue word irritated were seen as having more positive than negative importance for outcome.

References.

Andersson, G., Boalt Boethius, S. Svirsky, L. & Carlberg, G. (2006) Memories of significant episodes in child psychotherapy: An autobiographical approach, Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 79:229-36.

TURNING POINTS IN CHILD PSYCHOTHERAPY

1995 – 1999

Project leader: Gunnar Carlberg PhD, Professor, licensed psychologist and psychotherapist.

Aim. To investigate the nature and content of change, and factors underlying change processes in psychodynamic child psychotherapy.

Method. Data from crucial, data-rich episodes in several child psychotherapies were systematically collected in four studies. The narratives of the psychotherapists were supplemented with data from questionnaires and analyses of process notes. Data were collected from fourteen child psychotherapies through interviews, process records and questionnaires. In addition, examples of changes in 102 psychotherapies were collected through a questionnaire. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in the analysis of data.

Results. Different kinds of turning points could be described. A few were turning points in the sense of a sudden, unexpected change that persisted. Some were best categorised as ‘the process goes on’. It was often possible to reconstruct a process leading up to the change. How one categorises an identified change is dependent on factors such as ‘the severity of the child’s disorder’ and on ‘the way the psychotherapist organises his experience of psychotherapy processes’. The therapists’ experiences of turning points can be seen as a part of their way of creating meaning. In the beginning of therapy turning points were connected with ‘the therapeutic alliance’ and later with ‘conflict’ and ‘working through’. From the analysis of factors seen as underlying change processes, a description of conditions beneficial for change was given. The meeting between two subjects, mutually influencing each other could be considered the nucleus of change.

References.

Carlberg, G. (1997). Laughter opens the door: turning points in child psychotherapy. Journal of Child Psychotherapy. 23, 331-349.

Carlberg, G. (1999). Vändpunkter i barnpsykoterapi. Psykoterapeuters erfarenheter av förändringsprocesser, [Turning points in child psychotherapy. Psychotherapists’ experiences of change processes]. Dissertation, Department of Education, University of Stockholm. Edsbruk: Akademitryck.

Carlberg, G. (2010). Focused systematic case studies – An approach linking clinical work and research. I J. Tsiantis & J. Trowell (Eds.), Assessing change in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy of children and adolescents: Today's Challenge, EFPP Monograph, London: Karnac.

Turning-points in child psychotherapy.

 

 

Publications in Swedish

A series of reports and articles have been published. Examples of topics:

  • Children´s expectations and experiences of psychodynamic child psychotherapy.

  • The child psychotherapist´s countertransference feelings.

  • Counter-transference in psychotherapy with children and adolescents.

  • Work with parents.

  • Group supervision.

  • Evaluation of the Erica Foundation´s course in the psychodiagnostic evaluation of children.

  • Emotional learning.

  • Description and analysis of the role of course tutor in a psychotherapy training program.

  • The CAT (Children´s  Apperception Test).

  • The Machover method. A handbook with a development theory perspective.

  • A historical account of the Erica Foundation´s training in child psychotherapy.

  • Psychotherapy with children and adolescents from a historical perspective.

Recent publications in English

  • Andersson, G., Boalt Boethius, S. Svirsky, L. & Carlberg, G. (2006). Memories of significant episodes in child psychotherapy: An autobiographical approach, Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 79:229-36.

  • Blomberg, B. (2006). Time, space and the mind: psychotherapy with children with autism. In D. Houzel, & M. Lanyado (Eds.), Invisible boundaries psychosis and autism in children and adolecents. EFPP Clinical Book Series. London: Karnac.

  • Carlberg, G. (2008). Clinically based research at the Erica Foundation. Mellanrummet, no 18, 103-109.

  • Carlberg, G. (2009). Exploring change proceses in psychodynamic child psychotherapy. The therapists´perspectives. In N. Midgley, J. Anderson, E. Grainger, T. Nesic-Vuckovic & C. Urwin (Eds.) Child psychotherapy research: New approaches, emerging, findings: London. Routledge.

  • Carlberg, G. (2010). Focused systematic case studies. An approach linking clinical work and research, In J. Tsiantis & J.Trowell, (eds.) Assessing change in psychoanalytic psychotherapy of children and adolescents: Today’s challenge , EFPP Clinical Book Series. London: Karnac,

  • Carlberg, G, Thorén, A, Billström, S. & Odhammar, F. (2009). Children’s expectations and experiences of psychodynamic child psychotherapy. Journal of Child Psychotherapy, 35:2, 175-193.

  • Carlberg, G., Eresund, P. & Boalt Boëthius, S. (2009). Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Research. Workshop for Clinicians and Researchers at the Erica Foundation October 2008. Stockholm: Ericastiftelsen.

  • Cleve, E. (2004). From chaos to coherence: Psychotherapy with a little boy with ADHD. London: Karnac Books.

  • Cleve, E. (2008). A big and a little is gone. London Karnac Books.

  • Nilsson, M. (2000). The doll´s house:dream or reality? A borderline girl´s psychotherapy. Journal of Child Psychotherapy, 26 (1), 79-96.

  • Nilsson, M. (2006). To be the sole therapist – children and parents in simultaneous psychotherapy. Journal of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy, 5 (2), 206-225.

  • Nilsson, M. (2009). Table hockey - attack or linking? Psychoanalytic psychotherapy with an autistic boy. Journal of Child Psychotherapy, 35:2, 131-141.

  • Odhammar, F., Sundin, E.C., Jonson, M. & Carlberg, G. (2011). Children in psychodynamic psychotherapy. Changes in global functioning. Journal of Child Psychotherapy. 37 (3), 261-279.

  • Odhammar, F. & Carlberg, G. (2015). Parent's and psychotherapists' goals prior to psychodynamic child psychotherapy. European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling 17 (.3) 277-295.

 

Page updated 2017-06-20   webmaster | Top of page | Back one page | Photo: Susanne Kronholm
Ericastiftelsen – Odengatan 9, 114 24 Stockholm – Tfn: 08-402 17 60 – Pg: 15 10 44-5 – Orgnr: 802005-8841